SHIPS AND THE SEA II

Cog Crusades Medieval Shipbuilding 5 Min Read

Only in the fifteenth century did a combination of scientific and technological advances—the magnetic compass and the astrolabe, better maps, commercially available navigational charts, and ships of stronger construction, superior design, and improved rigs—allow mariners to challenge, though by no means to conquer, the seas. Only then did open ocean navigation become a regular, practical, and potentially year-round, though still

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Battle British Cog France Naval 10 Min Read

The Battle of Winchelsea

A depiction of medieval naval combat from Jean Froissart’s Chronicles, 14th century. King Edward’s flagship, Cog Thomas. In 1350, King Edward III of England was at peace—with Scotland, after capturing King David II at the Battle of Neville’s Cross in 1346, and with France, after a decisive victory at the

Cog Crusades Medieval Shipbuilding 6 Min Read

SHIPS AND THE SEA I

Late 12th Century Northern Cog. Ships built in the ancient period were too feeble to routinely take to the sea in any but fair weather. Longships—rowed galleys—were the state-of-the-art ships-of-war of the day, but they could not venture far. The classic Mediterranean galley had a freeboard too low to test

Cog Crusades Medieval Shipbuilding 5 Min Read

SHIPS AND THE SEA II

Only in the fifteenth century did a combination of scientific and technological advances—the magnetic compass and the astrolabe, better maps, commercially available navigational charts, and ships of stronger construction, superior design, and improved rigs—allow mariners to challenge, though by no means to conquer, the seas. Only then did open ocean

Cog Crusades 4 Min Read

SHIPS AND THE SEA III

Round Ship Northern Europeans owed their maritime dominance over their southern neighbors, and ultimately over the entire world, to a pair of interrelated developments. First, northerners quickly adopted, by necessity rather than choice, improved roundships as war platforms; the Mediterranean states, both Christian and Muslim, did not. Second, the northern

Cog Ottoman Sail 10 Min Read

North versus South in Naval technology

Large cog with the Latin sail aft and by light gun on the turning ring mount which ruled in the Baltic region and the North Sea almost 300 years. The galley, be it of Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Arab, or Turkish design, was not an effective seagoing weapon system. Galley fleets

Cog Medieval 2 Min Read

COGS IN CONTEMPORARY ART

A remarkably realistic depiction of a sea fight between two cogs, dated to c. 1300-1320 by details of the armour and the ships’ construction. The picture emphasizes the importance of shock combat as the ultimate arbiter of boarding fights, although the two archers, identifiable as English longbowmen by the size

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COGS IN CONTEMPORARY ART

A remarkably realistic depiction of a sea fight between two cogs, dated to c. 1300-1320

The Battle of Winchelsea

A depiction of medieval naval combat from Jean Froissart’s Chronicles, 14th century. King Edward’s flagship,

SHIPS AND THE SEA I

Late 12th Century Northern Cog. Ships built in the ancient period were too feeble to

SHIPS AND THE SEA III

Round Ship Northern Europeans owed their maritime dominance over their southern neighbors, and ultimately over