Kaibo-Kan Escorts

KAIBOKAN C and D

The C Type class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. The Japanese called them “C Type” ocean defense ships, and they were the fifth class of Kaibokan (Kai = sea, ocean, Bo = defense, Kan = ship), a name used to denote a multi-purpose vessel.

The C Type, like the Ukuru-class and Mikura-class, were dedicated to the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine role.

In 22 April 1943, the Navy General Staff decided a mass production of escort ships, because of the urgent need to protect the convoys which were under constant attack. The plan was to build a basic escort ship of around 800 tons, with a simple design for easy construction. The first designs, for “Type A” Etorofu class and “Type B” Mikura class, still needed too many man-hours for building, so in June 1943, the Navy General Staff planned for a simplified design. The result was the Ukuru class, and a scaled down model of the Mikura class, which became the “C Type” and “D Type” escort classes.

Because of Japan’s deteriorating war situation, the C Type class was a further simplification of the Ukuru design. They were smaller by 200 tons and the Diesel engines that propelled them were also smaller, at 1900 SHP vs 4200 for the Ukurus. Because of the decrease in engine power, the speed fell from 19.5 knots to 16.5. The range remained the same, 6500 miles at 14 knots. The number of 4.7″ guns went from three to two. The number of depth charges aboard was the same, 120, but the number of depth charge throwers was decreased from 18 to 12 and the depth charge chutes were decreased from two to one.

Due to the simplifications of the design, a significant saving was made in construction time. The C type escorts required approximately 20,000 man-hours each, compared to the 35,000 man-hours of the Ukuru’s and the 57,000 man-hours of the Mikura’s.

The design work of the C Type ships started in March, 1943, the same time as the Ukuru class. They were built concurrently with the Ukuru class and the D Type-class. The C Type class were given odd numbers, while the D Type were given even numbers. The C Type were constructed using prefabricated sections that enabled them to be built in as little as three to four months. The lead ship, No.1 (CD-1) was constructed at Mitsubishi, laid down on 15 September 1943, and completed with the No.3 (CD-3) on 29 February 1944.

The C Type escorts were assigned to the Destroyer Divisions and Escort Divisions for convoy escort operations. However by 1944 the advantage had passed to the US, and many C Type vessels became casualties as the Japanese merchant fleet was devastated by the American submarine offensive. There were 53 finished during the war of the 300 planned, and several completed after World War II ended. 26 were sunk during the war.

Ships lost

    CD-1, commissioned on February 19, 1944. CD-1 was sunk by B-25 bombers on April 6, 1945.

    CD-3, commissioned on February 29, 1944. CD-3 was sunk by TF 38 carrier aircraft on January 9, 1945 at 27-10N, 121-45E.

    CD-5, commissioned on March 19, 1944. CD-5 was sunk by carrier aircraft on September 9, being set afire and later blowing up and sinking at 15-30N, 119-50E.

    CD-7, commissioned on March 10, 1944. CD-7 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Ray on November 14, 1944 at 17-46N, 117-57E.

    CD-9, commissioned on March 28, 1944. CD-9 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Gato on January 12, 1945 at 32-43N, 125-37E.

    CD-11, commissioned on April 5, 1944. CD-11 was damaged and had to be beached by B-25 bombers on November 10, 1944 at 10-51N, 124-32E.

    CD-13, commissioned on April 26, 1944. CD-13 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Torsk on August 14, 1945, the day before the end of the war.

    CD-15, commissioned on May 1, 1944. CD-15 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Raton on June 6, 1944.

    CD-17, commissioned on May 7, 1944. CD-17 was torpedoed and damaged by USS Tilefish on July 18, 1944. CD-17 was sunk by carrier aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-19, commissioned on May 20, 1944. CD-19 was sunk by TF 38 carrier aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-21, commissioned on August 18, 1944. CD-21 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Seahorse on October 6, 1944.

    CD-23, commissioned on October 29, 1944. CD-23 was sunk by carrier aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-25, commissioned on July 30, 1944. CD-25 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Springer on October 6, 1944.

    CD-31, commissioned on October 13, 1944. CD-31 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Tirante on April 14, 1945.

    CD-33, commissioned on October 13, 1944. CD-33 was sunk by carrier aircraft on March 28, 1945.

    CD-35, commissioned on November 21, 1944. CD-35 was sunk by carrier aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-39, commissioned on November 9, 1944. CD-35 was sunk by B-25 “Mitchells” on August 7, 1945, the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

    CD-41, commissioned on November 26, 1944. CD-41 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Sea Owl on July 9, 1945.

    CD-43, commissioned on September 10, 1944. CD-43 was sunk by carrier aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-47, commissioned on November 2, 1944. CD-47 was damaged by aircraft on three occasions, on January 29, February 15, and July 30, 1945. She was torpedoed and sunk by USS Torsk on August 14, 1945, the day before the end of the war.

    CD-51, commissioned on October 29, 1944. She was sunk by TF 38 aircraft on January 12, 1945.

    CD-53, completed on November 28, 1944. On February 7, 1945 She was torpedoed and sunk by USS Bergall.

    CD-65, completed on February 13, 1945. She was sunk on July 14, 1945 by TF 38 carrier aircraft.

    CD-69, completed on December 20, 1944. She was sunk on March 16, 1945 by B-25s.

    CD-73, completed on April 5, 1945. On April 16, 1945, just eleven days after completion, she was torpedoed and sunk by USS Sunfish.

    CD-75 , completed on April 12, 1945. She survived the war, but was torpedoed and damaged by Soviet submarine L12 on August 22, 1945. She was scuttled the next day.

    CD-213, completed on February 12, 1945. On August 18, 1945, after the war ended, she sank after striking a mine.

    CD-219, completed on January 25, 1945. She was sunk by TF 38 carrier aircraft on July 15, 1945 off Hakodate.

Successes

    USS Growler was sunk on November 8, 1944 by CD-19 with Chiburi and destroyer Shigure.

    USS Trigger was sunk on March 28, 1945 by CD-33 and CD-59 with Mikura.

    USS Bonefish was sunk on June 19, 1945 by C Types CD-63, CD-75 and CD-207 with Okinawa and CD-158.

    USS Salmon was rendered unfit for further service by damage from CD-33 and CD-29 with CD-22 on October 30, 1944.

The D Type class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II. The Japanese called them “D Type” coast defence ships, and they were the sixth class of Kaibokan (Kai = sea, ocean, Bo = defence, Kan = ship), a name used to denote a multi-purpose vessel.

The D Type, like the Ukuru-class and Mikura-class, were dedicated to the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine role.

In 22 April 1943, the Navy General Staff decided a mass production of escort ships, because of the urgent need to protect the convoys which were under constant attack. The plan was to build a basic escort ship of around 800 tons, with a simple design for easy construction. The first designs, for “Type A” Etorofu class and “Type B” Mikura class, still needed too many man-hours for building, so in June 1943, the Navy General Staff planned for a simplified design. The result was the Ukuru class, and a scaled down model of the Mikura class, which became the “C Type” and “D Type” escort classes.

Because of Japan’s deteriorating war situation, the D Type class was a further simplification of the Ukuru design and were built to the same design as the C Type escort ship. However, due to a shortage of diesel engines to power both groups of vessels, the D Type were powered by turbine engines. This gave a slight increase in speed, from 16.5 to 17.5 knots, but a reduction in range and endurance, 4500 miles at 16 knots instead of 6500 miles. The D Type was the only Kaibokan type to use turbines.

They were smaller by 200 tons than the Ukuru’s and engines that propelled them were also smaller, at 2500 SHP vs 4200 for the Ukurus. Because of the decrease in engine power, the speed fell from 19.5 to 17.5 knots. The number of 4.7″ guns went from three to two. The number of depth charges aboard was the same, 120, but the number of depth charge throwers was decreased from 18 to 12 and the depth charge chutes were decreased from two to one.

Due to the simplifications of the design, the construction time was significantly reduced. The D type escorts required approximately 20,000 man-hours each, compared to the 35,000 man-hours of the Ukuru’s and the 57,000 man-hours of the Mikura’s.

The design work for the D Type ships started in March 1943, at the same time as for the Ukuru class. They were built concurrently with the Ukuru class and the C Type-class. The D Type were given even numbers while the C Type class were given odd numbers. The D Type were constructed using prefabricated sections that enabled them to be built in as little as three to four months. The lead ship, “No.2” (CD-2) was constructed at Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, laid down on 5 October 1943, launched on 30 December 1943, and completed on 28 February 1944. CD-198 was the fastest build, being constructed in only 74 days; she was laid down on 17 January 1945, and completed on 31 March 1945.

Most of the D Type escorts were assigned to the Escort Fleet. However, they were not able to stop the American submarine offensive. One drawback was they did not have an effective fire-control system. They were equipped only with one height rangefinder for the AA guns and were powerless against an air attack. Despite being simple to construct they however proved themselves very durable for their size. Of the 22 instances of torpedoes striking them, they survived 9 times, with the CD-30 being struck and surviving on two separate occasions. Of the seven occasions when they struck mines, only one sank.

During the war 68 ships were finished out of the 200 planned; 25 were sunk during the war.

Ships lost

    CD-4, commissioned on March 7, 1944. CD-4 was attacked and damaged on July 24, 1945 then again on July 25 before being sunk by carrier aircraft on July 28, 1945.

    CD-6, commissioned on March 15, 1944. CD-6 was Torpedoed and sunk by USS Atule and sunk with all 200 men on August 13, 1945, two days before the end of the war.

    CD-10, commissioned on February 29, 1944. CD-10 was torpedoed and damaged by USS Pargo on June 28, 1944. She was torpedoed and sunk by USS Plaice on September 27, 1944, losing all but 8 men.

    CD-18, commissioned on March 8, 1944. CD-18 was sunk by B-25 bombers on March 29, 1945.

    CD-20, commissioned on March 11, 1944. CD-20 was sunk by US aircraft on December 30, 1944.

    CD-24, commissioned on March 28, 1944. CD-24 was sunk by USS Archerfish on June 28, 1944.

    CD-28, commissioned on May 31, 1944. CD-28 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Blenny on December 14, 1944.

    CD-30, launched on May 10, 1944 and commissioned on July 26, 1944. CD-30 was damaged by a torpedo from USS Bang on September 19, 1944. She was again damaged by a torpedo from USS Puffer on January 10, 1945. She was sunk by British carrier aircraft on July 28, 1945.

    CD-38, commissioned on November 6, 1944. CD-38 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Hardhead on November 11, 1944.

    CD-46, commissioned on October 8, 1944. CD-46 was sunk August 17, 1945 by a mine, two days after the war ended.

    CD-48, commissioned on March 13, 1945. CD-48 survived the war and was ceded to the USSR as a war reparation on August 28, 1947.

    CD-54, commissioned on September 30, 1944. CD-54 was sunk by US TF 38 carrier aircraft on December 15, 1944.

    CD-56, completed on September 27, 1944. CD-56 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Bowfin on February 17, 1945.

    CD-64, commissioned on September 25, 1944. CD-64 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Pipefish on December 3, 1944.

    CD-66, commissioned on September 30, 1944. She was sunk on March 13, 1945 by aircraft.

    CD-68, completed November 20, 1944. She was sunk March 24, 1945 by TF 58 carrier aircraft.

    CD-72, completed on January 31, 1945. CD-72 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Haddo on July 1, 1945.

    CD-74, completed on December 10, 1945. CD-74 was sunk by US TF 38 carrier aircraft on July 14, 1945.

    CD-82, commissioned on December 31, 1944. She was sunk by Soviet aircraft on August 10, 1945.

    CD-84, commissioned on December 31, 1944. CD-84 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Hammerhead on March 29, 1945.

    CD-112, completed on December 8, 1944. CD-112 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Barb on July 18, 1945.

    CD-134, completed on November 11, 1944. She was damaged by US PBMs on March 29, 1945 and was sunk April 6, 1945 by US B-25s.

    CD-138, completed on December 5, 1944. She was sunk by US aircraft on January 2, 1945.

    CD-144, completed November 23, 1944. CD-144 was torpedoed and sunk by USS Besugo on October 24, 1944.

    CD-186, commissioned on February 15, 1945. She was sunk by TF 38 carrier aircraft on April 2, 1945.

Successes

    USS Harder was sunk on August 24, 1944 by CD-22.

    USS Scamp was sunk on November 11, 1944 by CD-4.

    USS Swordfish may also have been sunk by CD-4 on January 4, 1945, though evidence is unclear.

    USS Snook was sunk by CD-8, CD-32, and CD-52 with Okinawa on April 9, 1945.

    USS Bonefish was sunk on June 19, 1945 by CD-158 with CD-63, CD-75 and CD-207 and Okinawa.

    USS Salmon was rendered unfit for further service by damage from CD-22 with CD-33 and CD-29 on October 30, 1944.

KAIBOKAN C

KAIBOKAN D

KAIBOKAN

KAIBOKAN A SHIMUSHU and ETOROFU and B MIKURA and UKURU

The Shimushu class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

The Japanese called these ships Kaibōkan, “ocean defence ships”, (Kai = sea, ocean, Bo = defence, Kan = ship), to denote a multi-purpose vessel. They were initially intended for patrol and fishery protection, minesweeping and as convoy escorts. The four ships of the Shimushu class would provide the foundation for the five following classes of 171 Japanese Kaibōkan-type escort ships.

The Shimushu class was initially armed with just twelve depth charges, but this was doubled in May 1942 when their minesweeping gear was removed. The ASW weaponry would later rise to 60 depth charges with an 8 cm trench mortar and six depth charge throwers. The number of AA machine guns was increased to 15.

    Shimushu: Launched, 13 December 1939. Commissioned, 30 June 1940. Ceded to the Soviet Union, 5 July 1947.

    Hachijo: Launched, 10 April 1940. Commissioned, 31 March 1941. Scrapped, 30 April 1948.

    Kunashiri: Launched, 6 May 1940. Commissioned, 3 October 1940. Wrecked, 4 June 1946.

    Ishigaki: Launched, 14 September 1940. Commissioned, 15 February 1941. Torpedoed and sunk by submarine USS Herring on 31 May 1944.

The Etorofu class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

The Japanese called these ships Kaibōkan, “ocean defence ships”, (Kai = sea, ocean, Bō = defence, Kan = ship), to denote a multi-purpose vessel. The fourteen ships of the Etorofu class were a major part of Japan’s escorts from the middle of World War II. They were denoted “Improved Type A” ships, and were the second class of Kaibōkan. The Etorofus, unlike the Shimushu-class, received more emphasis on submarine warfare.

The Etorofu class was initially armed with thirty-six depth charges and would later rise to 60 depth charges with an 8 cm trench mortar and six depth charge throwers. The rise of aircraft also saw the number of AA machine guns increase to 15. They would receive Type 22 and Type 13 radars and Type 93 sonar in 1943-1944.

The ships of the class were the Etorofu, Hirado, Tsushima, Fukue, Matsuwa, Mutsure, Sado, Oki , Manju, Kanju, Iki, Amakusa, Wakamiya, and Kasado.

Eight of the fourteen ships, Hirado, Iki, Amakusa, Kanju, Wakamiya, Sado, Mutsure, and Matsuwa were sunk during the war.

The Mikura class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

The Japanese called these ships Kaibōkan, “ocean defence ships” (Kai = sea, ocean, Bō = defense, Kan = ship), a name used to denote a multi-purpose vessel. The eight ships of the Mikura class served as convoy escorts during World War II. They were denoted “Type B” and were the third class of Kaibokan. The Mikuras, unlike the two preceding Etorofu-class and Shimushu-class, were dedicated to the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine role.

The Mikura class was initially armed with 120 depth charges with six depth charge throwers and would later receive an 8 cm trench mortar. The number of AA machine guns was increased to up to eighteen. They received Type 22 and Type 13 radars, and Type 93 or Type 3 sonar in 1943-1944.

Two ships of the class probably had success against US submarines, with Mikura helping to sink USS Trigger with kaibokans CD-33 and CD-59 on March 28, 1945. Chiburi also helped sink USS Growler with destroyer Shigure and kaibokan CD-19 on 8 November 1944.

    Mikura, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on October 1, 1942, launched on July 16, 1943, and commissioned on October 30, 1943. Sunk by torpedoes from the USS Threadfin on March 28, 1945, with all 216 men aboard, after probably helping sink the USS Trigger.

    Miyake, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on February 12, 1943, launched on August 30, 1943, and commissioned on November 30, 1943. Miyake was sold for scrap on July 2, 1948.

    Awaji, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, and laid down on June 1, 1943, launched on October 30, 1943, and completed on February 15, 1944. Torpedoed on June 2, 1944 by USS Guitarro with the loss of 76 men.

    Kurahashi, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, being laid down on June 1, 1943, launched on October 15, 1943 and commissioned on March 10, 1944. On January 16, 1945, Kurahashi was damaged by near misses from TF 38 carrier aircraft that killed 2 and wounded 14. She survived the war and was ceded to the UK as a war reparation on September 14, 1947 and shortly after was sold for scrapping.

    Nomi, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, being laid down on August 10, 1943, launched on December 3, 1943, and commissioned on March 15, 1944. Sunk on April 14, 1945, by two torpedoes from the USS Tirante, that hit her under her bridge and sank her with the loss of 134 men as she was attacking the submarine.

    Chiburi, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on July 20, 1943, launched on November 30, 1943 and commissioned on May 13, 1944. Sunk in an air attack on January 12, 1945, losing 88 men.

    Yashiro, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on November 18, 1943, launched on February 16, 1944, and commissioned on June 6, 1944. Yashiro survived the war and was ceded to China on August 29, 1947, being renamed Cheng An before being discarded in 1954.

    Kusagaki, constructed at Nihon Kōkan, Tsurumi, laid down on September 7, 1943, launched on January 12, 1944, and commissioned on July 1, 1944. Sunk on August 7, 1944, by torpedoes from USS Guitarro, with the loss of 97 men.

The Ukuru class escort ships were a class of ships in the service of the Imperial Japanese Navy during World War II.

The Japanese called these ships Kaibōkan, “ocean defence ships” (Kai = sea, ocean, Bō = defense, Kan = ship), a name used to denote a multi-purpose vessel. The twenty-nine ships of the Ukuru class were a major part of Japan’s escort force from the middle of World War II. They were denoted “Modified Type B”) ships, and they were the fourth class of Kaibokan.

The Ukurus, like the Mikura-class, were dedicated to the anti-aircraft and anti-submarine role. The Ukuru class was a further simplification of the Mikura design. The Ukurus were constructed using prefabricated sections that enabled them to be built in as little as four months. Despite being easy to build, they proved quite durable, with 11 occurrences of the class striking mines and only 3 sinking, one of which was after the war. Ikuna survived being torpedoed by the USS Crevalle and striking a mine as well.

The Ukuru class was initially armed with 120 depth charges with 2 Type 94 depth charge projectors, sixteen Type 3 depth charge throwers and two depth charge chutes and would later receive an 8 cm trench mortar. The number of AA machine guns was increased to 16 to 20 25mm. They received Type 22 and Type 13 radars, and Type 93 or Type 3 sonar in 1943-1944.

Okinawa was the most successful ship of the class, helping to sink two US submarines, the USS Snook on April 14, 1945 with the kaibokans CD-8, CD-32, and CD-52; and USS Bonefish on June 19, 1945 with kaibokans CD-63, CD-75, CD-158, and CD-207

There were 29 ships completed of 142 planned.

    Ukuru, constructed at Nihon Kokan, Tsurumi, laid down on October 9, 1943, launched on May 15, 1944, and commissioned on July 31, 1944. Ukuru survived the war and later became a weather survey ship in the Japanese Maritime Transport Bureau before being sold for scrapping on November 24, 1965.

    Hiburi, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on January 3, 1944, launched on April 10, 1944, and commissioned on June 27, 1944. Hiburi was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Harder on August 22, 1944 with 154 killed and wounded.

    Shonan, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on February 23, 1944, launched on May 19, 1944, and commissioned on July 13, 1944. Shonan was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Hoe on February 25, 1945 with 198 crew and passengers killed.

    Daito, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on February 23, 1944, launched on June 24, 1944, and commissioned on August 7, 1944. Daito survived the war, but was lost while minesweeping shortly after the war ended on November 16, 1945.

    Okinawa, constructed at Nihon Kokan, Tsurumi, laid down on December 10, 1943, launched on June 19, 1944, and commissioned on August 16, 1944. Okinawa was damaged by a bomb in an air attack by P-38s while escorting TA no. 2 on November 5, 1944 and damaged by PT boats on November 9 and by aircraft again on November 18, 1944. Okinawa was sunk on July 30, 1945 by aircraft from HMS Formidable.

    Kume, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on May 26, 1944, launched on August 15, 1944, and commissioned on September 25, 1944. Kume was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Spadefish with the loss of 89 men.

    Ikuna, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on June 30, 1944, launched on September 4, 1944, and commissioned on October 15, 1944. Ikuna was hit by a torpedo by USS Crevalle and damaged on April 10, 1945. On August 1, she struck a mine and was damaged. Ikuna survived the war and later became a weather survey ship in the Japanese Maritime Transport Bureau before being sold for scrapping on May 25, 1963.

    Shinnan, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on June 30, 1944, launched on September 4, 1944, and commissioned on October 21, 1944. Shinnan survived the war and later became a weather survey ship in the Japanese Maritime Transport Bureau before being sent to the petrol development agency in October 1967. She was scrapped in 1975.

    Yaku, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on June 30, 1944, launched on September 4, 1944, and commissioned on October 23, 1944. Yaku was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Hammerhead with the loss of 132 men.

    Aguni, constructed at Nihon Kokan, Tsurumi, laid down on February 15, 1944, launched on September 21, 1944, and commissioned on December 2, 1944. On May 27, 1945, Aguni was damaged by a Bat glide bomb. The bomb’s 1,000-lb warhead exploded off Aguni’s starboard bow demolishing the whole foredeck area ahead of the bridge and killing 33 sailors. After being hit, Aguni’s crew had to cut her anchor chain to free her. Kaibokan CD-12 was dispatched to assist Okinawa in rescuing Aguni’s crew, but despite the heavy damage the kaibokan remains navigable and proceeds stern first to Pusan, Korea on her own power. Aguni survived the war and was sold for scrapping on May 20, 1948.

    Mokuto, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on November 5, 1944, launched on January 7, 1945, and commissioned on February 19, 1945. On April 4, 1945, Mokuto struck a mine and sank.

    Inagi, constructed at Mitsui, Tamano, laid down on May 15, 1944, launched on September 25, 1944, and commissioned on December 16, 1944. Inagi was bombed and sunk by planes from HMS Formidable on August 9, 1945 with the loss of 29 killed and 35 wounded.

    Uku, constructed at Sasebo Navy Yard, laid down on August 1, 1944, launched on November 12, 1944, and commissioned on December 30, 1944. Uku struck a mine on 9 April, 1945 and was damaged. She survived the war and was ceded to the United States as a war reparation and later scrapped.

    Chikubu, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on September 8, 1944, launched on November 24, 1944, and commissioned on December 31, 1944. Chikubu survived the war and later became a weather survey ship in the Japanese Maritime Transport Bureau before being sold for scrapping on October 4, 1962.

    Habushi, constructed at Mitsui, Tamano, laid down on August 20, 1944, launched on November 20, 1944, and commissioned on January 10, 1945. Habushi struck a mine on April 8, 1945 and was damaged. She survived the war and was ceded to the United States as a war reparation and scrapped starting October 17, 1947.

    Sakito, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on September 7, 1944, launched on November 29, 1944, and commissioned on January 10, 1945. On June 27, 1945, Sakito struck a mine and was damaged. Sakito survived the war and was scrapped on December 1, 1947.

    Kuga, constructed at Sasebo Navy Yard, laid down on August 1, 1944, launched on November 19, 1944, and commissioned on January 25, 1945. Kuga struck a mine on June 25, 1945 and was damaged. She survived the war and was scrapped on June 30, 1947.

    Ojika, constructed at Mitsui, Tamano, laid down on September 7, 1944, launched on December 30, 1944, and commissioned on February 21, 1945. Ojika was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Springer on June 2, 1945.

    Kozu, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on October 20, 1944, launched on December 31, 1944, and commissioned on February 7, 1945. She survived the war and was ceded to the Soviet Union as a war reparation on August 28, 1947.

    Kanawa, constructed at Mitsui, Tamano, laid down on November 15, 1944, and commissioned on March 25, 1945. Kanawa survived the war and was ceded to the UK as a war reparation and scrapped on August 14, 1947.

    Shiga, constructed at Sasebo Navy Yard, laid down on November 25, 1944, launched on February 9, 1945, and commissioned on March 20, 1945. Shiga survived the war and later became a weather survey ship in the Japanese Maritime Transport Bureau before being discarded on May 6, 1964. Her hull became the pavilion for Maritime Amusement Park in Chiba City, but her hull deteriorated because of poor maintenance and was dismantled and scrapped in 1998.[3]

    Amami, constructed at Nihon Kokan, Tsurumi, laid down on February 14, 1944, launched on November 30, 1944, and commissioned on April 8, 1945. Amami survived the war and was ceded to the UK as a war reparation and scrapped on December 20, 1947.

    Hodaka, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on November 27, 1944, launched on January 28, 1945, and commissioned on March 30, 1945. She survived the war and was ceded to the United States as a war reparation and scrapped starting March 1, 1948.

    Habuto, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on December 3, 1944, launched on February 28, 1945, and commissioned on April 7, 1945. Habuto struck a mine on June 6, 1945 and was damaged. She struck a second mine on June 10, 1945 and was again damaged. She survived the war and was ceded to the UK as a war reparation and scrapped on July 16, 1947.

    Iwo, constructed at Maizuru Navy Yard, laid down on November 25, 1944, launched on February 12, 1945, and commissioned on March 24, 1945. Iwo struck a mine on June 13, 1945 and was damaged. She was damaged lightly in an air attack by planes from the USS Shangri-La, losing 4 killed and 61 wounded. She survived the war and was scrapped starting July 2, 1948.

    Takane, constructed at Mitsui, Tamano, laid down on December 15, 1944, launched on February 13, 1945, and commissioned on April 26, 1945. Takane survived the war and was scrapped starting November 27, 1947.

    Ikara, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on December 26, 1944, launched on February 22, 1945, and commissioned on April 30, 1945. On August 9, 1945, Ikara struck a mine and sank.

    Shisaka, constructed at Hitachi, Sakurajima, laid down on August 21, 1944, launched on October 31, 1944, and commissioned on December 15, 1944. She survived the war and was ceded to the China and later the Peoples Republic of China as a war reparation and was later demilitarized in 1955.

    Ikuno, constructed at Uraga dock, laid down on January 3, 1945, launched on March 11, 1945, and commissioned on July 17, 1945. She survived the war and was ceded to the Soviet Union as a war reparation on July 29, 1947.

SHIMUSHU

ETOROFU

MIKURA

UKURU

KAIBOKAN

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